4 Tips For RV Storage Security

21 April 2015
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Finding a good deal on RV storage rates definitely helps the budget conscious. In addition, if you wish to place a number of personal belongings in the RV, then the vehicle could serve as a makeshift and cost-cutting storage unit. Most rental facilities state they are "not responsible for stolen or lost items" so you have to do a little extra work to ensure the security of any belongings. Here are some tips for accomplishing this:

1. Use Security Boxes

Simply putting valuables into storage boxes and placing them inside of the RV is not enough. Sure, the RV door is locked and the storage premises have a security system in place, but you want to take additional steps, since the RV is going to be left unattended for possibly several weeks or months. 

For very valuable items, purchase a storage box with a built-in combination lock. High-end security boxes are extremely difficult to open without the right combination. Thieves might not even bother to take them due to all the extra work.

2. Install Drawer and Closet Alarms

If security boxes are a little too expensive to afford, put belongings in drawers or closets and then affix inexpensive drawer/closet alarms. Once these alarms are tripped, the surprising and shrill noise will attract attention and surely chase off burglars.

3. Hang a "Warning" Sign

Hanging a sign on the side of the RV stating "If anyone sees someone attempting to enter or occupy the RV, please alert security immediately" might seem like overkill, but the sign could prove effective in deterring break-ins.

You could even set up a cheap VOiP phone number with an instant messenger service. Add the phone number to the sign as a backup. This way, suspicious activity could be reported on a voicemail. Even if no one calls, taking the initiative to show you take security seriously might scare away anyone pondering an illicit entry.

4. Hire Someone to Perform a Spot Check

Have someone stop by the RV once a month and visually inspect the exterior. In addition to checking out possible attempts at break-ins, the inspector could look for signs of damage from the weather or if the RV was hit by a vehicle. Request the person take picture of the exterior and email the images to you. This way, you can double-check things on your own.

Don't rely on a friend or relative to handle this task. Hire a professional who will reliably perform the task like clockwork. Vacation helpers and property sitters may provide such a simple service for a nominal fee.